Remembering 100 Years of Somme

What has notably been named as one of the Bloodiest Battles in the History of the British Army, The Battle of Somme was fought from 1st July to 18th November 1916 . This war was fought between the British and the French army on one side and the German army on the other. It is believed that over one million people were killed or wounded in this battle; around 19, 250 men died on one day alone; turning the battlefield into a river of blood. The battle is notable for the importance of air power and the first use of the tank.

Today, on the 1st of July, Manchester commemorated a 100 years since that dreadful day which snatched many sons, husbands, brothers and fathers from the people of Britain . All over the UK various services and parades were held marking a hundred years of the battle. In Manchester, the Service commenced by laying  wreaths in St. Peter’s Square, followed by a parade from Albert Square to Manchester Cathedral where another memorial service was to take place in the evening. Friends and families of those who had fought and lost a lot in the battle, were given the opportunity to make their personalised remembrances which would then be put together and finally offered at the Heaton Park Memorial . Heaton Park used to serve as a military training ground in those days; thus it would deem fit for the remembrances to be laid down there. 

The service at St Peter’s Square started at 1:30 pm. It was attended by George Osborne, Lord Mayor of Manchester – Carl Austin- Behan, Bishop of Manchester – Revd David Walker, Royal British Legion Chaplain- Rt. Revd. James Newcome ,  Bishop of Salford – Rt Revd, John Arnold . dignitaries from various consulates and a military band. Gun Fires marked and concluded a two minutes silence for the event. The event was live streamed by the BBC. 

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Live Streaming of St Peter’s Square Commemoration
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St Peter’s Square 

Thereafter a small parade was organised which originated from the Town Hall and concluded in Manchester Cathedral. Not only was the military and the brass bands a part of this parade; but also those whose descendants fought in the war took part in it. 

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Inspecting the grounds before the parade began 
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Albert Square, Town Hall
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The Parade Begins
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Hundreds Await The Parade 

 

 

The Battle of Somme indeed formed a part of the horrific and dark history of the British Army.Nevertheless, one cannot forget that those who laid down their lives did so to bring glory to their nation and a better future for the next generation. Thus,we must always salute their courage and bravery and uphold their strong ideals of patriotism and nationalism . 

 

 

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36 Comments Add yours

  1. Such a powerful post and pictures! Love!

    Love,
    Ivelisse | CarnationDreams.com

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos! It must have been amazing to see the event right where it’s taking place!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes. It was great. . 🙂

      Like

  3. laurahartleyy says:

    I’m glad that you decided to share this. I am afraid that as old war heroes have died that people will slowly forget about hugely significant battles like this. It’s especially important to make sure young people know what these events are for.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes. and you would have been amazed to see the number of youngsters (16-27) who came to attend this event along with the elders.

      Like

  4. SofarsoSabine says:

    We have to keep remembering war. It’s so important to remember what others have been through and to learn from it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Fatima says:

    I am never in support of any kind of war that leads to bloodshed or loss of lives! This is so inhumane. This was a good piece of information.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I visited Verdun, France last year. Verdun is one of the largest and longest battles of the First World War. It’s so moving to see how these men put their lives on the front lines to defence their countries. You capture the event really well through your writing and your amazing photos.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. DavidTofie says:

    It’s super cool to learn new things that I never came across before, very interesting event. I’m happy that people are interested and attending for this 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, many people came. . young an d old. . . such legacies cannot be easily forgotten by all.

      Like

  8. lilytravella says:

    In London they’ve had men dressed as soldiers walking around cities and towns and on public transport handing out cards with names of people that died all those years ago. It’s so moving.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes Yes I had heard about the remembrance observed in London . I remember seeing glimpses of it on TV as well.

      Like

  9. liz cleland says:

    I would love to visit at some point in my lifetime!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. As a serving military guy, I thank you for capturing this event so well. Very positive, well written and poignant. Cheers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank You 🙂 Very much

      Like

  11. lizellecruz says:

    It’s nice to know that history is still being recognized until today. I have learned something new with your post.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. War always leaves a trail of blood, death, sadness and despair. It’s so sad that sons, fathers, brothers are made to fight.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Elizabeth O. says:

    It’s so heartbreaking, so many lives were lost and yet it’s just another day in our history. Although, I am glad that people still recognize this day and celebrate it. It’s awesome though, that even after 100 years they are honored for their sacrifices!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Jessica Ayun says:

    Great to see that events like this are still well-commemorated and let today’s people to know what really happened and who should be thanked for. Anyway, your photos documented well this event. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Rakel says:

    Love all your pictures and all your posts. Want to visit and read more of every single place you show us!

    http://www.alovelystyle.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  16. kemkem says:

    Love your images. I have never heard of this before. Thanks for the history lesson. It’s nice that they honor those who lost their lives fighting for their country. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Tiina A says:

    It’s so important to remember the past and history. I always think it’s great and also important to remmeber those people who fought for the free country in the past and sacrificed their lives so that we could have that freedom now.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Ivan Jose says:

    Thank you for that bit of history. Great photographs as well!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Ana De Jesus says:

    It saddens me that so many lives young and old were lost and I am proud to remember them and what they did for a country. This is why I don’t believe in war because it needlessly kills the young and old and for what? For prosperity perhaps but we should be more civilized and stop using guns as a way of resolving conflict.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I completely agree with you. I mean I believe there is always scope for settling differences through words and not guns. I support Peace.

      Like

  20. Vlad Vaida says:

    Ow I actually didn’t really knew the story behind this! Great post and I like how you captured all the details! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Denisa says:

    Never knew the story behind it , glad I come across to your blog. Lovely read and well captured event

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Saranda says:

    Great blogpost. At the moment my boyfriend and I are listening to a podcast about war history and the battle of Somme really interested me

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, So i guess the post fits well with your recent podcast. The other day I saw a documentary by BBC on photography during the First World War. if possible you can watch that too. Its simply amazing. . . .

      Like

  23. karlapitzen says:

    It sounds like a somber event. But, I agree, it’s important to honor those who were willing to give themselves for others. Impressive that such an effort is made 100 years later.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think some wounds are never really healed with time. they remain latent but remain in some corner of the heart.

      Like

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